Relationship

Fun things to do with your girlfriend

Looking for some fun ideas for things to do with your girlfriend? Check out these awesome activities that will keep you both entertained!

Dating Expert Janet Smith November 15, 2022 • 17 minutes read
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Let’s face it, sometimes it can be tough to come up with new and exciting things to do with your significant other. You spend so much time together that it can be hard to come up with new date ideas. And before you know it, you’re stuck in a cycle of boring weekday routines and your relationship is suffering because of it.[1]

Relationships are a crucial part of our lives [4] and when they are healthy, they can bring us a lot of joy and benefits, including improved survival, [5] social support, [6] and better access to resources.[7] But when we get too comfortable in our routines, it’s easy for the spark to start fading.[8]

Introducing new activities into your relationship is a great way to keep the spark alive and to bond with each other in new ways.[2] Doing so won’t only significantly improve your relationship, but it will also make you happier and more fulfilled as an individual.[3]

By now, you’re probably wondering what sorts of things you can do to break out of your relationship rut. Lucky you, because this article will give you a variety of different and fun things that you can do with your girlfriend. So whether you’re looking for something to do on a weekend afternoon or a fun date night activity, you’re sure to find something on this list that suits your fancy.

Sometimes, it’s nice to have a little help when planning your next date night. Here are some fun and cheap ways to do just that!

16 things to do with your girlfriend

While being in a relationship can present opportunities for growth and enrichment, the quality of your relationship could mean the difference between a healthy, long-term partnership and one that fizzles out after a few months. Those in unhappy relationships are more likely to suffer from anxiety and depression, [9] and are also at a greater risk for cardiovascular disease, chronic conditions, and depressive symptoms.[10]

So, how can you keep the spark alive and avoid falling into a relationship rut? One way is to regularly introduce new activities into your relationship. Doing so can help you bond with each other in new ways, and has been shown to significantly improve satisfaction and overall quality of relationships.[11]

If you’re looking for some fun things to do with your girlfriend, look no further. Here are 16 different and exciting things that you can do together.

1. Visit a new city or town together

When was the last time you de-stressed, explored, and had some fun together in an unfamiliar place? If it’s been a while, consider planning a weekend getaway to a new city or new town. Leisure activities, particularly, travel-related activities, are associated with reduced stress and anxiety and improved mental well-being.[12]

What’s more, you and your girlfriend will get to explore a new place together and create memories that will last a lifetime. So whether you live in a small town and want to visit a nearby city, or you’re planning a trip to a new country, get out there and explore together.

2. Plan a game night

Get your competitive juices flowing and bond with your girlfriend by planning a game night. Board games have therapeutic benefits [13] and provide an opportunity for you to interact and connect with each other in a fun and relaxed setting.[14]

Not to mention, playing a classic game like Monopoly or Scrabble can be a great way to bring some childhood nostalgia into your relationship. So round up your favorite games, order some pizza, and enjoy a fun night in with your girlfriend.

3. Visit a corn maze

Fall is the perfect time to visit a corn maze with your girlfriend. Not only will you get to enjoy the beautiful autumn weather together, but you’ll also get to test your problem-solving skills as you make your way through the maze.

You can also make things more fun by turning it into a competition and seeing who can get through the maze the quickest. There’s nothing like a little friendly competition to spice things up.

4. Enroll in a dancing class

Dancing is a great way to get active, relieve stress, and bond with your partner.(reference15) So why not enroll in a dancing class together?

You can learn how to salsa, ballroom dance, or even pole dance. Ballroom dance, in particular, can increase reaction time and other physical and cognitive skills.[16] So not only will you get to enjoy some quality time together, but you’ll also get a workout and potentially learn a new skill.

So put on your dancing shoes and get ready to have some fun with your girlfriend.

5. Plan a night-in and put on her favorite movie

Sometimes, the best way to show your girlfriend that you care is by doing something that she enjoys. Movies have the potential to positively impact your self-concept [17] and ability to understand and empathize with others.[18]

If your girlfriend is a movie buff, consider planning a night-in where you put on her favorite movie or any romantic movie that she’s been wanting to watch. You can make some popcorn, get cozy on the couch, and enjoy each other’s company.

6. Explore a hiking trail or nature reserve

There’s just something healing about being in nature, don’t you think? Being in nature has been shown to can reduce stress and anxiety, [19] and improve cognition, affect, memory and mood.[20]

So, ask yourself: when was the last time you and your girlfriend went on a hike or even just explored a nature reserve together? If it’s been a while, consider planning a day trip to a nearby hiking trail or nature reserve. It’ll be good for your mind, body, and soul.

7. Go on a hayride

What’s more festive than going on a hayride with your girlfriend in the fall? You can cuddle up together under a blanket and enjoy the scenic views as you ride through the countryside.

Hayrides are also a great opportunity to bond with your girlfriend and catch up on each other’s lives. So if you’re looking for a fun and festive way to spend some quality time together, go on a hayride this fall.

8. Go to a thrift store

The emerging trend of thrifting has taken the world by storm in recent years, and for good reason.(reference21) Thrifting is a great way to find unique items, save money, and reduce your environmental impact.[22]

With the rise of TikTok, more and more people are getting into thrifting and the stigma against second-hand items is slowly dissipating.[23] So, if you and your girlfriend are looking for a fun activity to do together, go thrifting at your local thrift store. You never know what treasures you’ll find.

9. Dress and take her to the theater

If your girlfriend is a fan of the theater, consider taking her to see a play or musical. Exposure to arts and theater has been linked to an increased sense of belonging and social interaction, [24] and improved academic and social skills.[25]

So not only will you get to enjoy a night out at the theater together, but you’ll also be doing something that’s good for her mental health and well-being. It’s a win-win.

10. Prepare her favorite meal or order from her favorite restaurant

Offering food is one of the oldest and most universal forms of showing love and appreciation.[26] Does your girlfriend like peanut butter and jelly sandwiches? Does she have a favorite restaurant that she always craves?

You can show your girlfriend how much you care about her by making her favorite meal or ordering from her favorite restaurant. It’ll be a delicious way to show your love.

11. Make each other handmade gifts

Nothing says “I love you” like a handmade gift. They’re personal, they’re unique, and they show that you care enough to take the time to make something special for your girlfriend.

Pursuit an arts and crafts project together or make something separately to surprise each other with. Doing so won’t only be a fun way to spend some time together and make your relationship stronger, but it’ll also give you a chance to show your creative side and improve your mental health and well-being.[27]

This one-of-a-kind gift will be something your girlfriend will cherish for years to come.

12. Plan a picnic in a nearby park

A picnic is a great way to spend time together outdoors and enjoy each other’s company. Plus, it’s a lot cheaper than going out to eat.

So, if you and your girlfriend are looking for a fun and budget-friendly activity to do together, plan a picnic in a nearby park. Don’t forget the blanket and the food.

13. Have a weekend getaway

If vacations may be off the table for now, that doesn’t mean you can’t have a weekend getaway with your girlfriend. Did you know that short trips can be just as beneficial as long vacations?[28]

There are many places you can go to for a quick recharge, you just need to know where to look. Join Facebook groups in your area, do some research online, or ask your friends for recommendations.

With a little planning, you and your girlfriend can have a fun-filled weekend getaway without even leaving your city.

14. Visit a dive bar

Dive bars are a great way to relax, have some fun, and bond with your girlfriend over a shared love of cheap beer and greasy food.

If you’re new to a city or a town, visiting a dive bar can be one of the most illuminating ways to get to know the local culture and meet new people.[29] So, don’t be afraid to belly up to the bar and strike up a conversation with your girlfriend and the person next to you.

15. Have a movie marathon

Maybe that one movie your girlfriend loves isn’t enough to burn through a whole night. But what if you watch five of her favorite movies back-to-back?

That’s the premise of a movie marathon. And it’s a great way to spend some quality time with your girlfriend while also indulging in her favorite pastime. Who knows, you might even enjoy some of the movies yourself.

16. Ask each other deep questions

If you’ve ever played the game “21 Questions,” then you know how interesting and revealing it can be to ask someone questions about their life. Asking questions doesn’t only provide an opportunity for you to get to know your girlfriend better, but the act itself can also deepen your bond and improve your relationship.[30]

So, if you’re looking for a fun way to spend some time with your girlfriend, why not ask each other some deep questions? You might be surprised at what you learn about each other.

If you have no idea where to start, here are some deep questions to get you started:

There are many fun things you can do with your girlfriend to show your love. So, don’t be afraid to get creative and think outside the box. Plan a special date, make a unique gift, or just spend some quality time together. Whatever you do, just make sure you’re present and enjoy the moment. After all, that’s what relationships are all about.


FAQ about things to do with your girlfriend

1. How can I be fun with my girlfriend?

When it comes to having fun with your girlfriend, the possibilities are endless. Remember to use your imagination, get creative, and be present in the moment.

Just the act of planning a date alone can promote closeness and bonding, so don’t be afraid to put some thought into it and brainstorm with your partner.[29] You can also try some new things together, like visiting a bar or going on a picnic.

And, of course, you can always fall back on classic activities like watching movies or asking each other questions. The important thing is to spend time together and enjoy each other’s company.

2. What can I do for free with my girlfriend?

Spending time with your girlfriend doesn’t have to be expensive. In fact, some of the best things you can do with your partner are completely free.

For example, you could take a walk in the park, cook a meal together, or have a picnic in your backyard. All these won’t only benefit your relationship, your health, [30] and your wallet, but they’re also great opportunities to bond with each other.

Of course, you can also find free or cheap activities in your area, like visiting a museum or going to a farmers market. And if you’re really stuck for ideas, you can always try something new and unexpected like stargazing or visiting a local fair.

3. What makes a girl happy?

The answer to this question may vary from girl to girl, so it’s important to ask your partner what makes her happy. Knowing her love language can also be helpful in this regard.[31] Perhaps she loves spending time with you, receiving compliments, or getting small gifts.

Generally, though, you can opt for the classic handwritten letter, flowers, or a heartfelt conversation.[32] The most important thing is to be genuine and make an effort to make her happy.

Or, if you want to get really creative, you can try making a coupon book filled with things like back rubs, foot massages, and home-cooked meals. Whenever she “redeems” one of her coupons, she’ll be sure to think of you and smile.

These are just a few ideas to get you started, but ultimately, it’s up to you to decide what will make your girlfriend happy. So, use your imagination and get creative.

4. How can I be romantic with no money?

There’s no need to spend a lot of money to be romantic. Sometimes, the simplest things can be the most romantic, like cooking dinner for your partner or writing a heartfelt letter.

You could also try some traditional romantic gestures like flowers, chocolates, or a candlelit dinner. If you’re on a tight budget, you can always get creative and make your own gifts or find free activities in your area.

There’s also nothing wrong with getting creative and thinking outside the box. For example, you could try making a book of poems, pictures, or love coupons. Put your heart into whatever you create and not even money can compare to the love and thoughtfulness you put into it.


The truth about dating: Books you need to read

If you’re looking for advice on how to have more success when it comes to dating, then you’ll want to check out these reads. Each can teach you something different about the process, from being more confident in yourself to reading other people’s signals correctly. So whether you’re just starting or have been dating for a while and could use help, check out these titles.

  1. Boundaries in Dating: How Healthy Choices Grow Healthy Relationships
  2. Love: The Psychology of Attraction: A Practical Guide to Successful Dating and a Happy Relationship
  3. Seriously, This Is Online Dating?: How to Love Yourself Harder and Date Smarter
  4. Single, Dating, Engaged, Married: Navigating Life and Love in the Modern Age
  5. Things You Should Already Know About Dating, You F*cking Idiot

References

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  2. Harasymchuk, C., Muise, A., Bacev-Giles, C., Gere, J., & Impett, E. (2020). Broadening your horizon one day at a time: The role of daily approach relationship goals in shaping self-expansion. Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, 37, 1910-1926.
  3. Johnson, M. D., Horne, R. M., Hardy, N. R., & Anderson, J. R. (2018). Temporality of couple conflict and relationship perceptions. Journal of Family Psychology, 32(4), 445.
  4. Baumeister, R. F., & Leary, M. R. (1995). The need to belong: Desire for interpersonal attachments as a fundamental human motivation. Psychological Bulletin, 117, 497-529.
  5. Black, C., Collen, B., Johnston, D., & Hart, T. (2016). Why Huddle? Ecological Drivers of Chick Aggregations in Gentoo Penguins, Pygoscelis papua, across Latitudes. PloS one, 11(2), e0145676. doi.org
  6. Uchino, B. N., Cacioppo, J. T., & Kiecolt-Glaser, J. K. (1996). The relationship between social support and physiological processes: a review with emphasis on underlying mechanisms and implications for health. Psychological bulletin, 119(3), 488.
  7. Beauchamp, Guy. (2014). Social Predation: How Group Living Benefits Predators and Prey.
  8. Call, V., Sprecher, S., & Schwartz, P. (1995). The incidence and frequency of marital sex in a national sample. Journal of Marriage and the Family, 639-652.
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  10. Hughes, M. E., & Waite, L. J. (2009). Marital biography and health at mid-life. Journal of health and social behavior, 50(3), 344-358.
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  12. Iwasaki, Y., MacKay, K., & Mactavish, J. (2005). Gender-based analyses of coping with stress among professional managers: Leisure coping and non-leisure coping. Journal of Leisure Research, 37(1), 1-28.
  13. Wilde, J. (1994). The Effects of the Let’s Get Rational Board Game on Rational Thinking, Depression, and Self-Acceptance in Adolescents. Journal of Rational-Emotive & Cognitive-Behavior Therapy, 12, 189-196. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF02354596
  14. Bochennek, Konrad & Wittekindt, Boris & Zimmermann, Stefanie-Yvonne & Klingebiel, Thomas. (2007). More than mere games: A review of card and board games for medical education. Medical teacher. 29. 941-8. 10.1080/01421590701749813.
  15. Schroeder, K., Ratcliffe, S. J., Perez, A., Earley, D., Bowman, C., & Lipman, T. H. (2017). Dance for Health: An Intergenerational Program to Increase Access to Physical Activity. Journal of Pediatric Nursing, 37, 29–34. doi.org
  16. Bonavolontà, V., Greco, F., Sabatini, U., Saavedra, F. J., Fischetti, F., Baldari, C., Guidetti, L., Vaccaro, M. G., & Emerenziani, G. P. (2021). Effects of Ballroom Dance on Physical Fitness and Reaction Time in Experienced Middle-Aged Adults of Both Genders. International journal of environmental research and public health, 18(4), 2036. doi.org
  17. Baran, S. J., Chase, L. J., & Courtright, J. A. (1979). Television drama as a facilitator of prosocial behavior:“The Waltons”. Journal of Broadcasting, 23(3), 277-284.
  18. Forge, K. L., & Phemister, S. (1987). The effect of prosocial cartoons on preschool children. Child Study Journal.
  19. Weiler, B., & Davis, D. (1993). An exploratory investigation into the roles of the nature-based tour leader. Tourism Management, 14(2), 91–98. doi.org
  20. Berman, M. G., Kross, E., Krpan, K. M., Askren, M. K., Burson, A., Deldin, P. J., Kaplan, S., Sherdell, L., Gotlib, I. H., & Jonides, J. (2012). Interacting with nature improves cognition and affect for individuals with depression. Journal of affective disorders, 140(3), 300–305. doi.org
  21. Thrift stores: We’re seeing more middle-class shoppers. (2008). The Associated Press. http://edition.cnn.com/2008/LIVING/wayoflife/10/06/thrift.shops.ap
  22. Herrmann, G. M. (2003). Negotiating culture: Conflict and consensus in US garage-sale bargaining. Ethnology, 237-252.
  23. Darley, W. K., & Lim, J. S. (1999). Effects of store image and attitude toward secondhand stores on shopping frequency and distance traveled. International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management.
  24. Hager, M. A., & Winkler, M. K. (2011). Motivational and demographic factors for performing arts attendance across place and form. Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, 41(3): 474–496. doi: 0899764011411095.
  25. Catterall, J. S. (2009). Doing well and doing good by doing art. Los Angeles: Imagination Group/I-Group Books.
  26. Hamburg, M. E., Finkenauer, C., & Schuengel, C. (2014). Food for love: the role of food offering in empathic emotion regulation. Frontiers in psychology, 5, 32. doi.org
  27. Ji, L., & Liu, Z. (2022). Analysis of the Effects of Arts and Crafts in Public Mental Health Education Based on Artificial Intelligence Technology. Journal of environmental and public health, 2022, 9201892. doi.org
  28. de Bloom, J., Geurts, S. A., & Kompier, M. A. (2012). Effects of short vacations, vacation activities and experiences on employee health and well-being. Stress and health : journal of the International Society for the Investigation of Stress, 28(4), 305–318. doi.org
  29. Harasymchuk, C., Walker, D. L., Muise, A., & Impett, E. A. (2021). Planning date nights that promote closeness: The roles of relationship goals and self-expansion. Journal of social and personal relationships, 38(5), 1692–1709. doi.org
  30. Zhao, W., Ukawa, S., Kawamura, T., Wakai, K., Ando, M., Tsushita, K., & Tamakoshi, A. (2015). Health Benefits of Daily Walking on Mortality Among Younger-Elderly Men With or Without Major Critical Diseases in the New Integrated Suburban Seniority Investigation Project: A Prospective Cohort Study. Journal of epidemiology, 25(10), 609–616. doi.org
  31. Mostova, O., Stolarski, M., & Matthews, G. (2022). I love the way you love me: Responding to partner's love language preferences boosts satisfaction in romantic heterosexual couples. PloS one, 17(6), e0269429. doi.org
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Dating Expert

Janet Smith

Janet Smith is a freelance writer who writes about psychology, relationships, and dating. She has always been interested in understanding the human brain and how it affects our …

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